Archives For flick

HOUSE (1977) Nobuhiko Obayashi

lw —  December 20, 2009 — Leave a comment

Novuhiko Obayashi’s flick Hausu aka House is just bizarre. It’s all over the place and bound to leave a lasting impression. A mind trip of a ghost tale mixed with warped bedtime story. The best quote that I’ve seen “an episode of Scooby Doo as directed by Dario Argento.”

CARDBOARD a cardboard animation!

lw —  October 18, 2009 — Leave a comment

House of the Devil (2009) Ti West

lw —  September 28, 2009 — Leave a comment

I’m sucker for 80’s horror and this throwback looks like it nails the best aspects of the genre. Over at the WorkBook Project I sat down with Ti to discuss his work. We’ll be posting the podcast in the next few weeks. Until then make sure to check out the flick which hits theaters on Oct. 30th.

Harmony Korine’s newest feature will premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival

U.S.A/2009, 78 min, color: A film unearthed from the buried landscape of the American nightmare, TRASH HUMPERS follows a small group of elderly Peeping Toms through the shadows and margins of an unfamiliar world. Crudely documented by the participants themselves, we follow the debased and shocking actions of a group of true sociopaths the likes of which have never been seen before. Inhabiting a world of broken dreams and beyond the limits of morality they crash against a torn and frayed America. Bordering on an ode to vandalism,it is a new type of horror; palpable and raw.

hat tip filmmaker mag

This film had a major impact on me when I first saw it at the age of 18. Especially love the look, palette and pacing.

I had the great fortune of lending a hand on this film. Esther is a dear friend and this film is an amazing exploration into the life and disappearance of her Uncle Danny. Earlier tonight I caught the film on the Sundance Channel. It is a moving piece of work that’s hauntingly beautiful. Props to t. griffin for the score and Danny’s own films are breath taking.

A solid flick with a great performance by Caine.


The trailer doesn’t really do it justice…


lw —  July 14, 2009 — 1 Comment

Support DIY filmmaking and make your way to the IFC center this coming Friday when DIED YOUNG, STAYED PRETTY opens for a one week run.

Official Selection of the 2009 South By Southwest Film Festival and 2008 Montreal World Film Festival, DIED YOUNG, STAYED PRETTY is a candid look at the underground indie-rock poster subculture in North America that was reborn, post-Punk, with the launch of groupie Clayton Hayes’ website The documentary reveals a new breed of subculturists who’ve set out to destroy the mainstream through their controversial and intensely visceral design work.

Under the guise of advertising for rock shows, these unheralded masters of the silkscreen and Xerox machine carry on public discourses that range from hot button political issues to lewd, inside jokes. Stealing pieces from America’s disposable culture, these graphic artists pervert classic references into beautiful obscenities that they slap in the face of polite society while safely treading under the radar.

Director Eileen Yaghoobian gives an intimate look at a few of the giants of the subculture, some who go broke to maintain their creative workshops while others have found commercial success. Featuring interviews with Tom Hazelmyer, Art Chantry, Brian Chippendale, the Ames Brothers, Jeff Kleinsmith, Jay Ryan, Print Mafia, and Rob Jones, among others, outside their own circle, they are virtually unknown, but within their ranks they are bareknuckle brawlers. Yaghoobian sneaks her lens into the lives of these self-professed radicals to discover where the real power lies, if any remains.